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Consortia

The Center for the Study of Biological Complexity has established collaborative relationships with other leading universities both inside and outside of the Commonwealth. These projects capitalize on the complimentary strengths of the units involved, and are funded by a variety of mechanisms. The objective of the Center involvement in these efforts is to enhance the strategic research capabilities, productivity and reputation of Center Fellows and VCU in the area of integrative molecular biology..

Currently, the Center is involved in several inter-institutional, national, and international research consortia:

The Cryptosporidium hominis Genome Project
The Cryptosporidium Functional Genome Project
The Mid Atlantic Regional Center of Excellence in Agents of Biological
     Terrorism and Emerging Infectious Diseases
The Streptococcus sanguinis Genome Project
The Virginia Bioinformatics Consortium
The Cancer Genomics Project
The Mucosal Autoimmunity Project
The Functional Genomics of Metacyclogenesis in Trypanosoma cruzi Project
The International Cyanobacteria Genome Annotation Project

The Cryptosporidium hominis genome project
is funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease of the NIH. Funded in May of 2000, the goal of this project is to complete the sequence of the human and animal isolates of the important water-borne pathogen, C. hominis. Dr. Gregory A. Buck, Director of the Center leads an international consortium involving Drs. Mitch Abrahamson and Vivek Kapur of the University of Minnesota, Drs. Giovanni Widmer and Saul Tzipori of Tufts University, Dr. Bill Pearson at University of Virginia, and Dr. Paul Dear of MRC-Cambridge. top

The Cryptosporidium Functional genome project
is funded by by National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease of the NIH. Funded in August, 2004, the goal of this project is to study the functional genomics of the protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium hominis. This project, launched in August, 2004, is under direction of Dr. Gregory A. Buck at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU). Drs. Shozo Ozaki, Ping Xu, Jay Alves, Patricio Manque, Myrna Serrano, Fernando Tenjo, Zhenming Chen, and Darrell Mallonee are VCU co-investigators. The VCU team is collaborating in this project with Drs. Giovanni Widmer and Saul Tzipori at Tufts University School of Veterinary Medicine. top

The Mid Atlantic Regional Center of Excellence in Agents of Biological Terrorism and Emerging Infectious Diseases
The Mid Atlantic Regional Center of Excellence in Agents of Biological Terrorism and Emerging Infectious Diseases is funded by by National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease of the NIH. Funded in September, 2003, the goals of this project are to develop new strategies to combat infectious agents. The VCU project is designed to use data from the C. hominis genome sequence to identify and generate new vaccine candidates and to identify and test new chemotherapeutic targets. The project is under the direction of Dr. Gregory A. Buck at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU). Drs. Ping Xu, Jay Alves, Patricio Manque, Myrna Serrano, and Fernando Tenjo are VCU co-investigators. The VCU team is collaborating in this project with Drs. Richard Guerrant, Oluma Bushen, Raul Destura, and James Roche at the University of Virginia. All of the components of the project are summarized at http://marce.vbi.vt.edu. top

The Streptococcus sanguinis genome project
is funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease of the NIH. Funded in June of 2000, the goal of this project is to complete the sequence of S. sanguinis, the important agent of bacterial endocarditis and dental disease. The project is under the leadership of Dr. Francis L. Macrina, Center Senior Fellow and Director of the Phillips Institute for Oral and Craniofacial Molecular Biology. top

The Virginia Bioinformatics Consortium
is funded by the Commonwealth of Virginia. The Center for the Study of Biological Complexity was awarded one fourth of a $3 million grant ($750,000) from the Commonwealth Technology Research Fund. The Virginia Bioinformatics Consortium is a collaboration between the Center at VCU, the University of Virginia (UVA), George Mason University, and Virginia Tech to develop bioinformatics infrastructure, analysis tools, and databases, and to more effectively leverage the bioinformatics expertise across the Commonwealth of Virginia. Gregory A. Buck, Ph.D., Director of the Center is the PI for the VCU component of this project.top

The Cancer Genomics Project is funded by the Commonwealth of Virginia. On December 1, 2001, the Center received the first installment of a three year $6 million grant to study the genetics of cancer. This grant from the Commonwealth Technology Research Fund was awarded to VCU, George Mason University, and the Inova Hospital System of Northern Virginia. VCU participants besides the Center include Pathology, Engineering, and the Massey Cancer Center. The Center will participate via its sponsorship of the MicroArraying Core of the Nucleic Acids Research Facilities and the High Performance Computing Cluster of the Bioinformatics Computational Core Laboratories. Dr. Carleton Garrett has been appointed overall PI of this project. Dr. Gregory A. Buck- Director of the Center, Gordon D. Ginder-Director of the Massey Cancer Center, and Dr. Anthony Guiseppi-Elie-Director of the Center for Bioelectronics, Biosensors and Biochips, are directors of the subprojects. top

Mucosal Autoimmunity Projectis funded by the Commonwealth of Virginia . On January 1, 2002 , the Center was awarded a three year $1.2 million award to hire faculty in the area of genomics of microbial pathogens from the Commonwealth Technology Research Fund. This grant is a component of a $3.6 million grant shared by VCU, UVA, and Virginia Tech, to discover and study potential vaccinogens for mucosal pathogens, to assess routes of administration of these vaccinogens, and to generate and test potential vaccines. Dr. Gregory A. Buck, Director of the Center, is VCU PI. Dr. William Petri is UVA PI, and Dr. Craig Nessler is the PI from Virginia Tech. Dr. Carole Cramer from CropTech Labs and Dr. David Lyerly from TechLabs are also project participants. The objective is to enhance the technology of vaccinogen identification using informatics technologies, and to use plant technologies to produce and deliver these vaccines.top

The Functional Genomics of Metacyclogenesis in Trypanosoma cruzi Project is funded the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease of the NIH. Funded in spring of 2002, the goal of this project is to use gene expression microarrays to characterize the differentiation of T. cruzi from non-pathogenic insect form epimastigotes into pathogenic metacyclic tryposmastigotes. T. cruzi causes Chagas' Disease, which affects some 20 million Latin Americans. Dr. Gregory A. Buck, Director of the Center, is the PI of an international team that involves other VCU scientists (Drs. Li Min Wen, Ping Xu, L. Shozo Ozaki, J. M. Alves, and Z. Cheng), and investigators from FIOCRUZ-Rio (N. Meireilles), IBMP-Curitiba (S. Goldenberg, M. Krieger, S. Fragoso). top

The International Cyanobacteria Genome Annotation Project is a proposal to the National Science Foundation. The goal of this project is to use an international consortium to coordinate the annotation of over a dozen cyanobacterial genomes already sequenced or being sequenced. Dr. Jeffrey Elhai, Senior Fellow of the Center, is the overall coordinator of this effort. There are more than two dozen other investigators involved in this international effort. top

 

 

 


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Date last modified: 5/30/07
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