Suspense Plot Clarification:
Example with Dialogue

THE PLAYWRITING SEMINARS > STRUCTURE > SHAPE > DIAGRAM > INCITING > PLOTS > SUSPENSE > TECHNIQUES > EXAMPLE > WITH DIALOGUE

Order 'We like to label people and suddenly when something about a character doesn't conform with the label, we get somehow irritated. Once you can put a label on somebody, you can put it in a drawer and you are done with it. But when you discover a character has different aspects, that someone you thought was 100 percent bad turns out to be only 50 percent bad, then it becomes very puzzling and we want to argue about it.'

-- Milos Forman


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Here's the annotated version -- with the playwright's dialogue -- of the introduction and clarification of the Suspense Plot from CAT ON A HOT TIN ROOF . . .

Inciting Incident introduces Suspense Plot
		MARGARET
...
-- Of course it's comical but it's also 
disgusting since it's so obvious what they're 
up to!
Clarifying Suspense Plot
		BRICK
	(Without interest)
What are they up to, Maggie?

		MARGARET
Why, you know what they're up to!

		BRICK
No, I don't know what they're up to.
	
	(He stands there in the bathroom 
	doorway drying his hair ....)
Suspense Plot clarified
		MARGARET
I'll tell you what they're up to, boy of mine! 
-- They're up to cutting you out of your 
father's estate, and --

	(She freezes momentarily before her 
	next remark. ...)

Cat on a Hot Tin Roof Copyright © 1955 by Tennessee Williams
The technical downside of letting this scoop out of the bag so quickly is that you throw away the chance to use the slow clarification of your Suspense Plot for generating more pages of dialogue.



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