The Resolution

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Order 'Why write the play if you know the end?'

-- John Guare








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Here's what Tennessee Williams left for the audience to work out, after settling the overriding question in CAT ON A HOT TIN ROOF: Who gets the money? Brick and his wife, Maggie, do. And we also know that Brick is willing to have a sexual relationship again with his wife -- at least briefly. But what we'll never know from the playwright is . . .


And if you want to push your luck to the limit with how much the audience is left not knowing, step out on this plank . . .

Open Endings


Then there's always the lure of . . .

Happy Endings


However you end the play, here's one of those sort-of Rules . . .

The central character of a play -- the one from whose Point of View the story is told -- nearly always has The Last Word. Assuming they're still alive.

A classic example of this is CAT ON A HOT TIN ROOF: In the original version of Act III, it's Brick's play and he has the last word. In the revised so-called Broadway version of Act III, it becomes Maggie's play and she has the last word.


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