Curtain Lines from Recent Plays

THE PLAYWRITING SEMINARS > STRUCTURE > SHAPE > DIAGRAM > CURTAIN LINE > EXAMPLES

Order 'Words should taste good in the mouth; they should sound good, too, have the right weight and heft to them . . . the more dangerous, alluring, mysterious, inflammatory, the better; the more we feel that they are driving us to the edge of some dangerous place, someplace that we've never quite been before, the better. . ..'

-- Robert Auletta



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A good Curtain Line lives -- if it does at all -- in a context.

It's possible to have a Curtain Line fall from the sky with no relationship to anything in the scene or act, but you'll be at the end of a very short line of playwrights who've tried this. This is a technique best left to Farce, or at least the wildest of comedies. The good news is, this approach can occasionally get you something like the old Saturday Night Live classic . . .

Missiles headed for New York. News at Eleven!

Some first-rate Curtain Lines from recent plays . . .
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